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HASS9: Geography Production process of a staple crop: Cocoa

Facts about cocao growing

Youtube: Published on Mar 10, 2015

This video is a good introduction to cocoa farming.

What is life like on a Fairtrade cocoa farm? Journey with us to the Ivory Coast and meet farmers from the ECOOKIM cooperative to understand more about where you chocolate comes from. 

“So far Fairtrade has made a big difference to us. With the income from our first premiums, for example, we were able to build two schools in the villages where we are active.” -Aboubakari Aidara Lamine, employee, ECOOKIM

“Increased production volumes, higher sales, better prospects for implementing projects, this is what we expect from Fairtrade and fair trading.” - Moussa Bamba, Chairman of ECOJAD

“To me, fair trading is more than empowerment for farmers. Fair trading enables them to sell their crops in a fair market while supporting their communities.” -Anne Marie Yao, Liaison Officer, Fairtrade International

Click on the image above for a fact sheet with graphs, images and facts

 13 year old Tayna travels to the Dominican Republic to find out where cocoa comes from.

This link fro CADBURY explains in easy to read text WHERE cocoa comes from and WHY : HARVESTING & PRODUCING COCOA BEANS

  • "In total, more than 20 million people depend directly on cocoa for their livelihood.
  • Once produced and processed into fermented dried merchantable cocoa, the beans are bought from farmers by one or more successive traders, transported then sold to grinders who make semimanufactured products (liquor, butter, presscake, powder).
  • These products are intended for chocolate makers or confectioners for the production of chocolate or chocolate-based products.
  • Approximately 90% of the production are exported in the form of beans or semi-manufactured cocoa products." 

Source : United Nations FAO http://www.fao.org/docs/eims/upload/216251/Infosheet_Cocoa.pdf

 

How is the production and demand spatially distributed?

Click on the image above to go to the site. As you can see from the map, most of the world's production comes from the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria & Equador.

Click on the map to go to the website. As you can see from the map, the majority of chocolate comes from Germany & Belgium.

Source: http://www.idhsustainabletrade.com/cacao-sustainability

This map shows the top 5 countries that produce cocoa beans and the countries they export them to (trade with), as well as the top 5 countries to export cocoa products.

Links students have found

Introduction to the Cocoa industry

Source: Youtube     Published on Nov 6, 2012

The World Cocoa Foundation is the leading non-profit organization in cocoa sustainability worldwide and represents more than 80% of the global cocoa market. For more information, visit www.worldcocoa.org.

 

This 6 minute long video explains all about where and why cocoa beans are grown, to how they are processed, what is being done to assist farmers by the large companies and the World Cocoa Foundation. A GOOD START.

Child slavery in the cocoa industry: A problem in the supply chain

Youtube: Uploaded on Jan 16, 2012


Everyone loves chocolate. But for thousands of people, chocolate is the reason for their enslavement. CNN's David McKenzie travels into the heart of the Ivory Coast -- the world's largest cocoa producer -- to investigate what's happening to children working in the fields.

 

Full article here : http://tinyurl.com/Child-Slaves-Cnn

 

 

PG 

 

2010     

44:24

How much do we really know about where chocolate comes from or how it's made? An undercover report on the cocoa trade in West Africa, which finds children as young as seven being used as slave labour on cocoa farms.

Susatianbility

Uploaded on Oct 14, 2010

With the support of the Millennium Village Project, farmers in Bonsaaso, Ghana have formed collectives. This enables experienced farmers to pass their knowledge along to the younger member of their community, thereby improving crop yields and nutrition.

This leads to improved living standards.